Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » Courses » ap-calculus

Topic: The Punchline
Replies: 4   Last Post: Jun 20, 1997 10:58 AM

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List Jump to Tree View Jump to Tree View   Messages: [ Previous | Next ]
Lou Talman

Posts: 876
Registered: 12/3/04
The Punchline
Posted: Jun 18, 1997 2:44 AM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

The entire argument that hand computation is necessary to understanding
mathematics, propounded and supported by Jerry Rosen and Wayne Bishop--among
others, reminds me of the admirals of the British Royal Navy during the period
following the Napoleonic Wars. Steam, they argued, would destroy seamanship,
just as Jerry and Wayne now argue that computers will destroy mathmanship.
(It's a poor word, but a good parallel.)

In point of fact, steam did destroy seamanship--as those old seadogs
understood it. But seamanship is alive and well today. That's because the
new technology changed the nature of seamanship.

If the goal is to bend rope to sail, sail to mast, and mast to ship in order
to steal way from the wind, then seamanship is alive only in the hands of a
few scattered practitioners; the old seadogs were right. But if the goal is
to ply the seas with what speed and safety (and even comfort) one might, then
seamanship thrives.

Mathematics will continue. Technology will change its face, and we see but
dimly, as in a glass. The same is true of mathematical pedagogy. The
question is not whether we should use calculators or computers, for surely we
will.

The real question is how to use them best.

--Lou Talman




Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.