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Topic: imputing racist motivation -- examples
Replies: 4   Last Post: Aug 18, 2000 1:45 PM

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Guy Brandenburg

Posts: 714
Registered: 12/3/04
imputing racist motivation -- examples
Posted: Aug 17, 2000 5:10 PM
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Dear list:

A certain self-styled educational expert who posts freqently on this
list has claimed that he has never accused others of racist motivation.
He has challenged us to come up with examples of his imputing racist
motives to others on this list. About 10 minutes' search of the archives
produced the following examples, but there are MANY, MANY more. Most of
that 10 minutes was taken in figuring how to find ANYTHING at all, and
then in cutting and pasting. All I had to do was pick a thread at random
and then click on almost anything written by him.

Interestingly, this self-styled educational expert claims that
self-styled educational experts should be barred from having anything to
do with education.

If anybody else feels like looking for other examples, here is the
address of the archives:

http://forum.swarthmore.edu/epigone/amte/

Guy Brandenburg

------------------------

Subject: Re: Message to David Klein -Reply
Author: Wayne Bishop <wbishop@calstatela.edu>
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 1998 00:48:43 -0600 (CST)

Hear no evil, see no evil, and there won't be any. "Being a racist" is
farther than I usually state or believe. Effectively racist policies by
well meaning people is quite different but the bottom line looks an
awfully
lot the same.

Wayne.
------------------------
Subject: Re: Dumbing Down Teachers
Author: Wayne Bishop <wbishop@calstatela.edu>
Date: Sun, 2 Aug 1998 03:41:58 -0500 (CDT)

Dear anonymous <rebrob@pacbell.net>,

I do regret having used that deliberate and offensive term and have
apologized
to my university for doing so. Not because of any implied racism, quite
the
reverse in fact. The context, you will recall, was the (fortunately
vain)
effort last summer, on the part of many in positions of influence, to
water
down the proposed California Math Standards from the original and
respectable
first draft. The criticism offered many times that day was the
standard, and
essentially elitist, racist and gender biased perspective that genuine,
verifiable standards are unattainable by African Americans, by Hispanic
Americans, and sometimes even by the majority, women, although good
people
never phrase it so bluntly. The term that I was deriding was the term,
"developmentally inappropriate", because good people don't use racially
offensive terms to describe their racially stereotypical beliefs. Good
people
deny my daughter's private school curriculum, pedagogy, and year-by-year
standards of development to inner city students, to reservation school
students, in general to students who need it most. Good people boldly
sign
their name "anonymous".

I regret my use of the term because it represents so much of my own
naive
ignorance. I should have realized that such obvious sarcasm in a
private
email conversation would be deliberately abused to a national and
influential
audience by good people.

Wayne.
------------------------------
Subject: Re: Slander
Author: Wayne Bishop <wbishop@calstatela.edu>
Date: Tue, 25 Aug 1998 00:54:16 -0500 (CDT)

Dear Bob,

>I'll be glad to refresh your memory, because my comments on this point
>were extensive and repeated. After re-reading them and having your memory
>refreshed, I trust that you will understand ...


Please, Bob, please. If that list of weak suggestions for "everything
but the
obvious" is what you meant, of course, I didn't give the items much
credence.
At best, the effects fall into the unverifiable category and perhaps
even the
laughable. At least with Sister Patricia, by actually reading her
specialist
thesis, I was able to see how much less there ever was than you had been
implying. The AISES piece you had me order and read is more of the
same,
hardly even removed from the "right-brained Indian mind" of a generation
early
that, quite frankly, strikes me as so inherently racist as to sound like
a
David Duke speech.

-------------------------


Subject: Re: Slander
Author: Wayne Bishop <wbishop@calstatela.edu>
Date: Fri, 7 Aug 1998 10:19:43 -0500 (CDT)

A week ago I posted the attached request to Ruth Parker to substantiate
her
self-serving claims of what she has done over the years for those
innocent
little Native American children, "one of our nation's most
under-represented
minorities when it comes to mathematics education".

<snip>

I am sure that in the eyes of some, asking for such information is
slander. I
see it quite differently; I see failing to produce such documentation
readily
and forthrightly as the same kind of paternalism that has kept
minorities "in
their place" for decades. Whether it is well-intentioned articles on
the
right-brainedness of American Indians (their non-PC but less
discriminatory
name) in the seventies and early eighties, the now defunct QUASAR
fiasco at
Spurgeon Intermediate praised so highly to the nation's math ed
community in
1995 by then NCTM president Jack Price ("...this school is more than 90
percent Hispanic, of whom more than 75 percent have limited or no
proficiency in
English"), or IMP imposed on defenseless African American kids at
Roosevelt
and Marshall here in LA with substantial NSF support through LA-SI that
is
going on right now, the situation remains the same. Separate but equal
was outlawed by
the Supreme Court in 1954. Why must it take a half-century for the
education
community to actually implement it? Will it take another half-century?

---------------------





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