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Topic: Turning schools into Registry of Motor Vehicles
Replies: 12   Last Post: Feb 8, 2010 10:06 PM

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James Elander

Posts: 20
Registered: 4/9/09
Re: Turning schools into Registry of Motor Vehicles
Posted: Feb 8, 2010 1:33 PM
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ATTENDANCE IS VERY IMPORTANT, OR IS EVEN THE KEY TO SUCCESS! HOW MANY
DAYS ARE THE STUDENTS ACTUALLY IN THEIR CLASSES? NOT THE 180, BUT MORE
LIKE 140 + OR - I AM TOLD. THIS IS ESPECIALLY PERTINENT IN MT SINCE
SOME SCHOOLS THAT COMPETE ARE 300 + OR- MILES APART. THE TAIL IS
GETTING BIGGER.

On Sun, Feb 7, 2010 at 10:53 PM, Haim <hpipik@netzero.com> wrote:
> Steve Cooke Posted: Feb 6, 2010 2:47 PM
>

>> Again, notice that the law is for attendance.
>
>   Fascinating.
>
>   So, under New York State COMPULSORY EDUCATION law, it is entirely up to the parents whether to send their children to public school, or to a parochial or independent school, or to home school.  Under Massachusetts COMPULSORY ATTENDANCE law, however, it is entirely up to the parents whether to send their children to public school, or to a parochial or independent school, or to home school.
>
>   Steve, if this distinction is important to you, then let's have it your way.
>
>   There still remains the question of accountability. WHAT do public schools, independent schools, and home schools account to the state for?  While Massachusetts law is COMPULSORY ATTENDANCE, we know the state tests public school children on points of education.  Furthermore, according to your own citation, http://www.mhla.org/index.htm
> home schoolers account to the state for the education of their children,
>
> - ----------------------
> http://www.mhla.org/information/massdocuments/charles.htm#4
> 4. Guidelines for Approval of Home Education Plan.
>
> Having concluded that the approval process under G.L. c. 76, Sec. 1, is constitutionally permissible, we caution the superintendent or school committee that the approval of a home school proposal must not be conditioned on requirements that are not essential to the State interest in ensuring that "all the children shall be educated."
> - ---------------------
>
>   This brings us back full circle.  HOW do home schoolers, and parochial and independent schools, account to the state for the education of their children?
>
>   Okay, so let me not be coy about this.  I raise this question because of the perennial tendency, in this forum, to decry the testing of public school children.  Yet, we see that two other social institutions, the independent schools (including parochial schools), and home schools, are also required to account to the state.  Yet, they have no trouble.  Accounting to the state is no impediment to these other social institutions in the furtherance of their goals.
>
>   In fact, talk to any home schooling parent, and the first thing you hear is just how low the bar is for them.  Historically, most parents who educated their children themselves did so for religious reasons.  In the past decade, an equal number of parents, and now more of them, run home schools for academic reasons.  From their point of view, the state's demands are laughably de minimis.
>
>   Not the parochial and independent schools, not home schooling parents, only public school teachers groan under the weight of state education demands.
>
>   Funny, that.
>
> Haim
> Keep The Change
>




- --
Jim



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