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Topic: All math paradox it seems i understand, leave mathematic ok...
Replies: 15   Last Post: Sep 25, 2012 11:53 AM

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Inverse 18 Mathematics

Posts: 175
Registered: 7/23/10
Re: All math paradox it seems i understand, leave mathematic ok...
Posted: Sep 24, 2012 3:51 PM
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On Monday September 24, 2012 3:00 PM, Graham Cooper wrote:
> On Sep 24, 1:43 pm, Dan Christensen <Dan_Christen...@sympatico.ca>
>
> wrote:
>

> > On Sep 23, 3:55 am, "io_x" <a...@b.c.invalid> wrote:
>
>
>

> > > Formalization of the problem
>
> >
>
> > > 1)Ep,C  peC
>
> > >   so C and p are constants [names]
>
> >
>
> > >   C is the set of Cretan
>
> > >   p is Epimenides element
>
> > >   this (1) traslate prhase
>
> > >   "The Cretan poet,"
>
> > >   in the math model
>
> >
>
> > > for now i not use "EC" [exist C]
>
> > > in formulas   nor "AC" [for all C]
>
> > > because C is already one costant [name]
>
> > > the same for p
>
> >
>
> > > 2)ER,T (Aa,y aeC/\yeR(a)=>¬yeT)eR(p)
>
> >
>
> > [snip]
>
> >
>
> > I'm having difficulty with your notation, but here, it looks like
>
> > "Aa,y (aeC/\yeR(a)=>¬yeT)" is supposed to be both a logical expression
>
> > AND an object that is an element of some set R(p). This is not
>
> > possible.
>
>
>
>
>
> E(R,T) A(a,y) [aeC ^ yeR(a) -> !yeT] e R(p)
>
>
>
> forall a,y, a is a Cretin and says y then y is unTrue, says p
>
>
>
> everything all Cretins say is a lie, says p
>
>
>
> I think he's using E(CAPS) like you use SET(S)
>
>
>
> Herc


Do you know that in French, "Cretin" means moron...



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