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Topic: Calendar formula for 2nd Wednesday of each successive month
Replies: 10   Last Post: Jan 27, 2013 12:21 AM

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Wally W.

Posts: 115
Registered: 6/15/11
Re: Calendar formula for 2nd Wednesday of each successive month
Posted: Jan 26, 2013 10:21 PM
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On Sat, 26 Jan 2013 22:34:02 +0000, Dr J R Stockton wrote:

>In sci.math message <4e36g89bid9bsio7bff99gti5hlkpq0208@4ax.com>, Fri,
>25 Jan 2013 18:00:21, Wally W. <ww84wa@aim.com> posted:
>

>>
>>>And I would guess that there is a general formula for what day is the
>>>1st of the month for the next ten years

>>
>>That would be a list of 120 days.

>
>
>A general formula is quite easy. Just consider what is needed for the
>reverse of Zeller's Congruence.


Not as easy as a spreadsheet formula for the purpose.


>One can simplify in this case by using the Julian Calendar, since no
>missing leap year is crossed.
>
>A spreadsheet is not a particularly good tool for the purpose; in
>Delphi, VBScript, and JavaScript, for example, it will be fairly easy
>(if following an intelligent approach) to find a Web site which has code
>for the "N'th X-day in a Month".


Define "good".

A spreadsheet is quite an effective tool for finding "what day is the
1st of the month."

It may lack the elegance of other methods; but so what?

The spreadsheet formula will be probably accurate until 2099. Nothing
in the problem spec suggests the checks will be issued after that
year.





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