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Topic: Potter's Law #17 - Quantum event return path -
Replies: 1   Last Post: Jun 26, 2013 11:59 PM

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Tom Potter

Posts: 497
Registered: 8/9/06
Potter's Law #17 - Quantum event return path -
Posted: Jun 24, 2013 6:24 AM
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A "transverse electro-magnetic" (TEM) wave
exists between two material points in a homogeneous medium.

The wave has an outgoing path,
AND
a return path.

Coax
===+
The return path in a coax is considered to be the outer conductor.

The transverse electric field exists between the conductors.
The transverse magnetric field exists about the inner conductor.
and is confined by the outer conductor.

http://images.books24x7.com/bookimages/id_22949/fig209_01.jpg


Stripline
======
The return path in a stripline is considered to be the outer conductor.

A transverse electric field exists between the conductors.
and transverse magnetric fields exists about the conductors.
but the EM fields are not entirely confined.

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=strip+line+TEM+mode&FORM=HDRSC2#view=detail&id=B8F1A6B8FB7B6442D77C6736E4206019439CAC01&selectedIndex=1

Potter's Law #17 states
that in a quantum interaction,
a direct path exits between a source and a sink,

and the return path of a quantum interaction
that leads to stable particles
is the universe.

A quantum interaction
changes the wave number between a source point
and a sink point by one fourth of a cycle.

http://www.spectroscopyonline.com/spectroscopy/article/articleDetail.jsp?id=337288

--
Tom Potter

http://the-cloud-machine.tk
http://tiny.im/390k






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