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Topic: Formal proof of the ambiguity of 0^0
Replies: 8   Last Post: Nov 18, 2013 10:49 PM

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Dan Christensen

Posts: 2,238
Registered: 7/9/08
Re: Formal proof of the ambiguity of 0^0
Posted: Nov 18, 2013 10:49 PM
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On Monday, November 18, 2013 6:17:13 PM UTC-5, Peter Percival wrote:
> Dan Christensen wrote:
>
>
>

> > While 0^0 = 1 may make sense in some applications, it doesn't make
>
> > sense if you are trying to formalize the notion repeated
>
> > multiplication of natural numbers. As I have shown here, it is only
>
> > one of infinite possibilities.
>
>
>
> You count 0 among the natural numbers, don't you?


For the purposes of this discussion, yes.


> If you can multiply
>
> any finite number of numbers together, say n of them, then the case n =
>
> 0 ought to be included.


You mean x^0?


> So if you multiply the numbers in the empty set
>
> together what do you get?
>


Surely, you aren't going suggest that the answer is 1. Not that it would be relevant in any case.

Dan
Download my DC Proof 2.0 software at http://www.dcproof.com
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