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Topic: Geometry, Common Core variety
Replies: 3   Last Post: Jun 3, 2014 5:07 PM

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Roberta M. Eisenberg

Posts: 233
Registered: 10/9/09
Re: Geometry, Common Core variety
Posted: Jun 3, 2014 3:24 PM
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There is an old book, from the 80s I think, called Transformation Geometry. The cover is blue and red. I don?t remember the author(s) nor the publisher. There are lots of proofs in there. I still remember the proof of the thm about the base angles of an isos. triangle.

At that time there were three high schools in NYS testing this course and there was a special Regents for those schools.

If you need me to look for it, I?ll look into my library of old books upstairs to get the rest of the info.

Bobbi

On Jun 3, 2014, at 3:03 PM, Howard Levine <hlevine216@aol.com> wrote:

> After seeing the Common core Sample Questions for geometry I would like to know if there is a source of exercises for proofs involving rigid motion or transformations. Frankly, I don't see the need for yet another layer of formal proof on top of the traditional proofs.
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