The Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by NCTM or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » sci.math.* » sci.math

Topic: Do you see patterns? Can you figure out a rule?
Replies: 9   Last Post: Sep 3, 2017 8:43 PM

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List Jump to Tree View Jump to Tree View   Messages: [ Previous | Next ]
David Bernier

Posts: 3,884
Registered: 12/13/04
Re: Do you see patterns? Can you figure out a rule?
Posted: Sep 3, 2017 8:43 PM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

On 09/03/2017 08:34 PM, David Bernier wrote:
> On 09/03/2017 05:39 PM, David Bernier wrote:
>> On 09/03/2017 11:56 AM, David Bernier wrote:
>>> On 09/03/2017 11:43 AM, David Bernier wrote:
>>>> On 09/03/2017 11:25 AM, David Bernier wrote:
>>>>> On 09/03/2017 07:17 AM, David Bernier wrote:
>>>>>> On 09/03/2017 02:44 AM, William Elliot wrote:
>>>>>>> On Sat, 2 Sep 2017, David Bernier wrote:
>>>>>>>

>>>>>>>> The first 128 terms, arranged in 16 rows of 8,
>>>>>>>> are:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>   1    2   3   4   5   6   7   8
>>>>>>>> ----------------------------------------
>>>>>>>>   0    0   0   0   0   0   0   0
>>>>>>>>   0    8   0   0   0   0   0   0
>>>>>>>>   16  16   0  16   0  16   0   0
>>>>>>>>   0   24   0   0   0   0   0   0
>>>>>>>>   32  32  32  32   0  32  32   0
>>>>>>>>   32  40   0  32   0  32   0   0
>>>>>>>>   48  48   0  48   0  48   0   0
>>>>>>>>    0  56   0   0   0   0   0   0
>>>>>>>>   64  64  64  64  64  64  64   0
>>>>>>>>   64  72  64  64   0  64  64   0
>>>>>>>>   80  80  64  80   0  80  64   0
>>>>>>>>   64  88   0  64   0  64   0   0
>>>>>>>>   96  96  96  96   0  96  96   0
>>>>>>>>   96 104   0  96   0  96   0   0
>>>>>>>> 112 112   0 112   0 112   0   0
>>>>>>>>    0 120   0   0   0   0   0   0
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Columns  1, 4 and 6 are identical so far.
>>>>>>>> Column 8 is all zeros so far.
>>>>>>>> Column 2 is the multiples of 8 from 0 so far.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>> Columns  4 and 6 are identical so far.

>>>>>>> Everything is divisible by 8.
>>>>>>>

>>>>>>
>>>>>> Indeed. By column, the GCDs seem to take values in:
>>>>>> 16, 8, 32, 64, undefined for the column of zeros,
>>>>>> so far anyway.

>>>>>
>>>>> I believe the patterns observed so far persevere at least
>>>>> for the 160 first terms, which are shown below in a
>>>>> format of 20 rows of 8 numbers:
>>>>>
>>>>>    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0
>>>>>    0    8    0    0    0    0    0    0
>>>>>   16   16    0   16    0   16    0    0
>>>>>    0   24    0    0    0    0    0    0
>>>>>   32   32   32   32    0   32   32    0
>>>>>   32   40    0   32    0   32    0    0
>>>>>   48   48    0   48    0   48    0    0
>>>>>    0   56    0    0    0    0    0    0
>>>>>   64   64   64   64   64   64   64    0
>>>>>   64   72   64   64    0   64   64    0
>>>>>   80   80   64   80    0   80   64    0
>>>>>   64   88    0   64    0   64    0    0
>>>>>   96   96   96   96    0   96   96    0
>>>>>   96  104    0   96    0   96    0    0
>>>>> 112  112    0  112    0  112    0    0
>>>>>    0  120    0    0    0    0    0    0
>>>>> 128  128  128  128  128  128  128    0
>>>>> 128  136  128  128  128  128  128    0
>>>>> 144  144  128  144  128  144  128    0
>>>>> 128  152  128  128    0  128  128    0

>>>>
>>>> It seems as though the numbers in rows 17, 18, 19, and 20 can be
>>>> obtained by adding 64, 0, or -64, or 128
>>>> to the number in the same column, but 8 rows  above, in rows
>>>> 9, 10, 11, and 12 . (mod 64 arithmetic applying ?)
>>>>

>>>
>>> The same table, in base 8:
>>>
>>>    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0
>>>    0   10    0    0    0    0    0    0
>>>   20   20    0   20    0   20    0    0
>>>    0   30    0    0    0    0    0    0
>>>   40   40   40   40    0   40   40    0
>>>   40   50    0   40    0   40    0    0
>>>   60   60    0   60    0   60    0    0
>>>    0   70    0    0    0    0    0    0
>>> 100  100  100  100  100  100  100    0
>>> 100  110  100  100    0  100  100    0
>>> 120  120  100  120    0  120  100    0
>>> 100  130    0  100    0  100    0    0
>>> 140  140  140  140    0  140  140    0
>>> 140  150    0  140    0  140    0    0
>>> 160  160    0  160    0  160    0    0
>>>    0  170    0    0    0    0    0    0
>>> 200  200  200  200  200  200  200    0
>>> 200  210  200  200  200  200  200    0
>>> 220  220  200  220  200  220  200    0
>>> 200  230  200  200    0  200  200    0

>>
>>
>> Now, the first 72 lines of 8, expressed in base 8:
>>
>>     0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0
>>     0    10     0     0     0     0     0     0
>>    20    20     0    20     0    20     0     0
>>     0    30     0     0     0     0     0     0
>>    40    40    40    40     0    40    40     0
>>    40    50     0    40     0    40     0     0
>>    60    60     0    60     0    60     0     0
>>     0    70     0     0     0     0     0     0
>>   100   100   100   100   100   100   100     0
>>   100   110   100   100     0   100   100     0

>
>    0     0     0     0     0     0     0     0  // row 1
>    0    10     0     0     0     0     0     0
>   20    20     0    20     0    20     0     0
>    0    30     0     0     0     0     0     0
>   40    40    40    40     0    40    40     0
>   40    50     0    40     0    40     0     0
>   60    60     0    60     0    60     0     0
>    0    70     0     0     0     0     0     0   // row 8
>
> [snip]
>
> 1000  1000  1000  1000  1000  1000  1000  1000  // row 65
> 1000  1010  1000  1000  1000  1000  1000  1000
> 1020  1020  1000  1020  1000  1020  1000     0
> 1000  1030  1000  1000  1000  1000  1000  1000
> 1040  1040  1040  1040  1000  1040  1040  1000
> 1040  1050  1000  1040     0  1040  1000  1000
> 1060  1060  1000  1060  1000  1060  1000  1000
> 1000  1070     0  1000  1000  1000  1000  1000  // row 72
>
> One can check that, modulo 8^3 = 512, the
>  (512+k)'th term and the k'th term are congruent,
> at least for 1 <= k <= 64.
>
> David Bernier


It reminds me of the 8-adics:
one could have periodicities of terms modulo
8^2, 8^3, 8^4, ... 8^10 and still not know
what the period of values looks like modulo 8^20 or
8^100 ...

David Bernier




Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© The Math Forum at NCTM 1994-2017. All Rights Reserved.