Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » Math Topics » geometry.pre-college.independent

Topic: Reuleaux triangle, Reuleaux drill
Replies: 25   Last Post: May 1, 1995 8:18 AM

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List Jump to Tree View Jump to Tree View   Messages: [ Previous | Next ]
Rex Boggs

Posts: 12
Registered: 12/6/04
Re: Reuleaux drill applications
Posted: Apr 16, 1995 5:19 PM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

>RE: Reuleaux Triangle drill
> Someone said here (I think it may have been M. Keyton)
>that there was a real drill using the principal
>of the Reuleau triangle. I am curious how that is driven. As well as
>I can understand this operation the shank or shaft that drives the

triangle would have to move in a four leaved rose pattern as the drill
>rotates and still provide rotational force.

In Martin Gardner's article "Curves of Constant Width", in his compendium of
some of his Sci Am articles, Further Mathematical Diversions (ISBN0 04
793015 22), he states:

"In 1914, Harry James Watt ... invented a rotary drill based on the R
triangle and capable of drilling square holes! Since 1916, these curious
tools have been manufactured by the Watts Brothers Tools Works in
Wilmerding. PA. ... A metal guide plate with a square opening is placed
over the material to be drilled. As the drill spins within the guide plate,
the corners of the drill cut the square hole through the material. A
patented 'full floating chuck' ... does the trick (US patents 1,241,175,..)."

So it appears that the chuck moves more or less freely, and presumably
centrifigal force aids in determining the position of the chuck at a given
instant. The original article was published in 1961-63, I wonder if the
Watts Brothers Tool Company is still in existance?

Cheers

Re (uleau)x
***


Rex Boggs | High above the hushed crowd,
rex@cq-pan.cqu.edu.au | Rex tried to remain focused.
| Still, he couldn't shake one
Glenmore High School | nagging thought: He was an
Rockhampton, Quensland | old dog and this was a new
Australia | trick - Gary Larson







Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.