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Topic: Problem of the Week, March 21-25
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Problem of the Week

Posts: 292
Registered: 12/3/04
Problem of the Week, March 21-25
Posted: Mar 21, 1994 4:32 PM
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The problem of the week is a regular feature here at the geometry forum.
Each weekend a high school level geometry problem will be posted, and the
following weekend a summary of solutions and their authors will be posted.

Please do not post solutions to the problem of the week; instead mail your
answer along with as detailed a description of your method as
necessary/possible to pow@forum.swarthmore.edu (replying to this message
will also work). Solutions should be received by midnight Friday so they
can be combined and posted over the weekend.

Please include your name, grade, and school along with your answer.

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Problem of the Week for March 21-25

One of the most familiar proofs of the Pythagorean Theorem shows a right
triangles with squares constructed on each of the edges. The sum of the
areas of the squares constructed on the edges equals the area of the
square constructed on the hypontenuse.

What's so special about squares? What if we used equilateral triangles
instead? Or maybe hexagons? Would these figures give the same result?
Why do you suppose squares are usually used?

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