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Topic: Responses to "Good Teachers Deserve a Taxbreak"
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Jerry P. Becker

Posts: 13,619
Registered: 12/3/04
Responses to "Good Teachers Deserve a Taxbreak"
Posted: Oct 21, 1998 4:20 PM
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Jerry P. Becker wrote:
>
> [Note: I think this is an interesting proposal, in the U.S. context.
>
> Good Teachers Deserve a Tax Break


____________

RESPONSE # 1:

I attended a talk last week by a Dr. Roger Taylor and he quoted from a
survey from USA Today. In reference to this article on low pay for
teachers and from the that the lack of recruitment of high quality
people. The survey was given on a college campus or campuses. Various
professions were listed, including teachers, and the choice of careers
was asked for if the starting salary for all the various jobs was to be
$100,000. Teaching received the highest percent of the population. I
don't remember the exact breakdown. It clearly shows that teaching is
respected as a career, but money is where the action is!

Thanks for all of your very worthwhile e-mail happenings. We as teachers
have to become politically active and alert.

Thanks,
Larry Kaber, Flathead High School , Kalispell, MT

_____________

RESPONSE # 2:

This proposal does have some merit. But a few comments:

1. The suggestion of applying the exemption just to elementary school
teachers is a non-starter. While I agree that the primary problem (pun
intended) in US public school education is at the elementary level, singling
out elementary school teachers at the expense of secondary school teachers
is obviously unfair.

2. The claim of "not requiring a new bureacracy" is disingenuous. The
administration of the proposed test to teachers - which may be a good idea -
would itself give rise to a large bureacracy.

3. The federal government is, indeed, the only realistic hope for improved
support for education in the US since any such increase would be only a
miniscule percentage of the federal budget. But Silber's suggestion should
be viewed as only one of many ways in which the federal government could
ameliorate the awful effects of local control of education in the US.

Tony Ralston

_______________

RESPONSE # 3:

I went through these notes with interest. The idea of tax
exemption for good teachers seems quite revolutionary. I am however
doubtful about its practicability. The better solution would be to raise
the salary structure of the school teachers. The teaching community is
generally low paid the world over. It is now high time that we give
adequate importance to this profession. In India teaching is considered
to be an act of sacrifice. You pay for consulting a doctor or a lawyer but
not a teacher. The high performers therefore do not resort to the teaching
profession.

The teachers in developed countries in my opinion are usually in a
helpless situation. Do you remember the lesson that we saw in one of the
schools in _________? The child simply refused to show his progress
card to his parents and the teacher could do nothing about it. In my childhood
we used to respect our teachers so much and used to follow their orders
sincerely. Respect towards the teachers needs to be established.

Regards,

Sudhakar Agarkar

**************************************************************










Jerry P. Becker
Dept. of Curriculum & Instruction
Southern Illinois University
Carbondale, IL 62901-4610 USA
Fax: (618)453-4244
Phone: (618)453-4241 (office)
E-mail: JBECKER@SIU.EDU





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