Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » Education » math-teach

Topic: MS-enrich vs. accelerate
Replies: 0  

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List  
JoanI10084@aol.com

Posts: 7
Registered: 12/6/04
MS-enrich vs. accelerate
Posted: Dec 19, 1995 6:28 PM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

I teach 8th grade math in a 6,7,8 middle school. For countless years, we
accelerate some students to take the 9th grade math course (formerly algebra,
now sequential course I). This allows them the option of taking AP calculus
as seniors.

However, this course, when given to 8th graders, is called "honors" (implying
beyond the scope and depth of typical) when in fact it is "accelerated"
(being the standard 9th grade math course given a year earlier).

I am interested in knowing how other middle schools and junior high schools
provide for their most capable math students.

Specifically, do you accelerate or enrich? Is this considered an honors
class? How are the students chosen for this class? Is there a differentiation
between students who are capable of merely passing the class (getting by)
versus students who are truly mathematically gifted/talented? What are some
of the pressures on the students in these courses? How does the high school
provide for these students? Is there further differentiation of ability
grouping in high school? Do these students indeed go on to take AP calculus
(or 4 years of math in high school)?

Thanks for your input. Feel free to reply to the list or to me personally.

Joan Indusi
AMD Middle School
Ossining, NY
Joani10084@aol.com





Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.