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Topic: Early Elementary - COMPILED
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Bill Richards

Posts: 25
Registered: 12/6/04
Early Elementary - COMPILED
Posted: Jun 14, 1995 6:04 PM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

Last week, I asked the NCTM-L subscribers for help in responding to a
request for information from a Michigan teacher about Early Elementary math
programs. I received a number of reponses that I have since passed on to
the teacher who had originally called me. He was VERY excited about this
input, and found it extremely valuable. He was also impressed with the
mechanism for gathering it - he had no idea such a resource existed.

So, I would like to thank everyone for contributing their suggestions; and
for displaying the power of this medium.

A compilation of the responses I received on this topic is included below.

Thanks again,

Bill

---------------------------------------------------------------
William R. Richards 23156wr@msu.edu
Producer/Director BillR@wkar.msu.edu
------------------ MICHIGAN GATEWAYS -----------------------
The Television Program for Teachers of Mathematics and Science
212 Communication Arts Bldg - East Lansing, MI 48824-1212
ph: 517 355-2300 ext 422 fx: 517 353-7124
------------ http://www.msu.edu/comptech/gateways -----------


======== My original post ==========================
Fellow Subscribers --

A teacher called me this morning at Michigan Gateways (the Television
Program for Teachers of Math and Science), looking for leads on "a new,
strong math program to adopt" for K-2. He told me that there is quite a bit
of "divisiveness" in his district now over what to adopt, and he would like
to know, "What are some of the best things out there?"

Since the Michigan Gateways series of programs frequently turns to the NCTM
standards as a point of reference as we examine math and science reform, we
can assume that he leans toward the NCTM-oriented side of the division
(simplifying--as we are all well aware at the moment, there are many sides
and no clear dividing lines). It was my impression that he was looking for
a program that he could make the best case for. Do you have any suggestions
that I could pass on to him as programs that he may wish to investigate?

I do have sources here at Michigan State University that I have put this
same question to, but I am also very interested in suggestions from the
NCTM-L subscribers.

Thanks for any help you can provide.

Bill Richards
====================================


Date: Mon, 5 Jun 1995 23:25:53 +0100
To: 23156wr@ibm.cl.msu.edu
From: dball@pilotb.msu.edu (Deborah Ball)
Subject: Re: Early Elementary programs

Bill,

The strongest program I know is called Investigations in Number, Data, and
Space, and is marketed by Dale Seymour, but they do not have the K-2 levels
finished yet. The 3 - 5 is. He might be best advised to wait for the
primary levels. Maybe he should look at the upper levels if he has not seen
it yet.

Deborah

====================================
Date: Mon, 5 Jun 1995 15:28:25 -0700 (PDT)
From: Ronald A Ward <ronaward@henson.cc.wwu.edu>
To: Bill Richards - Michigan Gateways <23156wr@ibm.cl.msu.edu>
Cc: nctm-l@forum.swarthmore.edu
Subject: Re: Early Elementary programs

Bill,

I would recommend "CSMP/21--the Comprehensive School Mathematics Program
for the Twenty-First Century," published by the McREL Education Laboratory
in Colorado. Contact person there is Clare Heidema, whose e-mail address
is: cheidema@mcrel.org

I recommend this particular program for several reasons:

1) it is easily the most "mathematical" of all programs available for the
primary grades; 2) it is a nationally validated program which means there
is adoption support available thru the National Diffusion Network; and 3)
many of the ideas appearing in the NCTM Standards were presaged by earlier
versions of the CSMP curriculum.

The only caution I have is that teachers must go thru a special teacher
education program before a school can adopt the program--you can't just
send in a book order and get the materials. But I personally view this as a
good feature. If the teacher who called you is also from Michigan, I feel
certain that there are "lighthouse sites" in your state where the new
CSMP/21 materials are being used.

Ron Ward/Western Washington U/Bellingham, WA 98225 ronaward@henson.cc.wwu.edu

====================================
From: roitman@oberon.math.ukans.edu
Date: Mon, 05 Jun 1995 17:33:17 -0500 (CDT)
Subject: Re: Early Elementary programs
To: nctm-l@forum.swarthmore.edu

Primary teachers I know have been pretty happy with Math Their Way, and Box
It & Bag It, two old chestnuts still serviceable after all these years.

I'd also be interested in hearing about newer and better stuff out there. I
know of middle school and upper grade stuff, but not new primary programs.

====================================
Judy Roitman, Mathematics Department
Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66049
roitman@math.ukans.edu
=====================================

====================================
Date: Mon, 5 Jun 1995 17:33:43 -0500 (CDT)
From: Cynthia Schimek <cschimek@tenet.edu>
To: Bill Richards - Michigan Gateways <23156wr@ibm.cl.msu.edu>
Subject: Re: Early Elementary programs

Look into the materials from the Mathematics Learning Center. They do Box
It or Bag It. Math Their Way is also very popular.

====================================
Date: Mon, 5 Jun 95 19:22:18
From: MARILYN TAHL <SOEMZT@vaxc.hofstra.edu>
Subject: k-2 math programs
To: BillR@wkar.msu.edu

Dear Bill,
By far the best program to look at is CSMP, Comprehensive School
Mathematics Program. If you don't know anything about it, contact Claire
Heidema at cheidema@mcrel.org for some sample information.
This program is problem solving oriented and totally follows the Standards.
We have used it in my school for the past 12 years and it is amazing how
"mathematically" our kids think.

Marilyn Tahl Soemzt@vaxc.hofstra.edu

====================================
Date: Tue, 6 Jun 1995 08:26:08 -0600
To: nctm-l@forum.swarthmore.edu
From: mlan@whe2.nl.edu (Marsha Landau)
Subject: Re: Early Elementary programs
Message-ID: <2FB6AC86DC7@WHE2.nl.edu>

On Mon Jun 5 Bill Richards asked for leads on early elementary programs.
Here's one possible resource:

gopher://goldmine.cde.ca.gov:70/00/

is (still, I hope!) a menu of offerings from the California Dept. of
Education. I downloaded the whole report last fall about the conclusions of
the state adoption committee. The report listed the criteria used to
evaluate programs, then examined and reviewed submitted programs, and
recommended some of the programs for adoption. A couple of programs were
specifically K-2; others were K-6 or K-8. I hope this helps!
Marsha

Marsha Landau
mlan@whe2.nl.edu
Associate Professor, Mathematics Education National-Louis University
2840 Sheridan Rd
Evanston, IL 60201

====================================
Date: Tue, 06 Jun 95 10:46:56 EST
From: Michelle@edc.org
To: nctm-l@forum.swarthmore.edu
Subject: Re[2]: Early Elementary programs

(I am not plugging any of these; I haven't taught from any of them. I'm
simply making available some information that I have available. All
descriptions were written by the project in question, pared down for
posting.)

Here are some programs that were funded by the NSF in the same round as
many of the middle and secondary projects that you know about:

TIMS Elementary Mathematics Curriculum Project (K-6) "TIMS is a
manipulative-based mathematics curriculum with significant experiences in
science and language arts. TIMS curriculum activities are hands-on,
collaborative projects ... The teacher is encouraged to help the children
to learn to communicate mathematically, both orally and in writing ... The
major premise underlying the TIMS curriculum is that mathematics is best
learned through active involvement in solving real problems. Science
provides an ideal setting for active learning ..."
Contact: Howard Goldberg and Phil Wagreich Institute for Mathematics and
Science Education M/C 250 University of Illinois at Chicago
840 West Taylor
Chicago, IL 60607
(312)996-2448

Cooperative Mathematics Project (K-6)
"CMP has been developing "Number Power," a cooperative problem-solving
instructional program for elementary mathematics, designed to foster the
development of students' number sense and mathematical reasoning, enhance
their ability to work together effectively and communicate their thinking,
and promote their commitment to basic social values of fairness,
responsibility, and concern for others." Contact: Laurel Robertson
Developmental Studies Center
2000 Embarcadero, Suite 305
Oakland, CA 94606
(510)533-0213

Investigations in Number, Data, and Space (K-5) "The major goals of this
program are to: 1) offer students meaningful mathematical problems and
activities 2) emphasize depth in mathematical thinking rather than exposure
to a series of fragmented topics
3) communicate mathematics content and pedagogy to teachers 4) serve as a
tool for expanding the pool of mathematically literate students"
Contact:Susan Jo Russell
TERC
2067 Massachusetts Ave.
Cambridge, MA 02140
(617)547-0430

There is also an elementary project here at EDC, funded by IBM. This is a
technology-intesive program (it requires access to IBM computers for use of
the software, which is a major component of the curriculum). It is called
"Math and More," and is focused on hands-on (both manipulative and
technology) learning and problem solving.
Contact: Betty Bjork
EDC
55 Chapel St.
Newton, MA 02158
(617)969-7100


Hope this is useful to someone. All typos are mine. Etc.

-michelle
--
Michelle Manes
Education Development Center, Inc.
michelle@edc.org
====================================

Date: Tue, 6 Jun 1995 11:25:54 -0600
To: 23156wr@ibm.cl.msu.edu (Bill Richards - Michigan Gateways)
From: eero@edmail.spc.uchicago.edu
Subject: Re: Early Elementary programs

>Hi,
I can send you information about the University of Chicago School
Mathematics Project. If you want this information, please send me your
address. My e-mail number is different from the one above. Mine is
siege@cicero.uchicago.edu

Carol

====================================

Date: Tue, 6 Jun 1995 15:33:30 -0500
To: nctm-l@forum.swarthmore.edu
From: mfhlh@uxa.ecn.bgu.edu (Howard L. Hansen)
Subject: Re: Early Elementary programs

Bill,

Everday Learning's series is available now for K-4 (Everyday Learning is
a private company, but closely tied to the University of Chicago School
Mathematics Project) After all the materials have been piloted this will
be a K-6 series. I think there's great stuff here, but it may be a difficult
transition for elementary teachers using "traditional" texts (like
Addison-Wesley).

Another interesting (and as far as I can tell at this time) challenging series
is Houghton Mifflin Mathematics (1995).

H^2

====================================

Date: Tue, 6 Jun 95 21:29:41 -0500
From: rfouchaux@EDU.YorkU.CA (Richard Fouchaux)
Organization: Faculty of Education, York U
Subject: Re: Re[2]: Early Elementary programs
To: nctm-l@forum.swarthmore.edu

>TIMS Elementary Mathematics Curriculum Project (K-6) . . . . .

I have taught from this one, at least [TIMS]. I found the activities
(which can
mainly be characterized as science experiments) to be useful and interesting
enough, but in every case they took easily twice as long to perform as the
lesson plan estimated.

The beauty of them is in the so-called TIMS Steps which precede and guide
every activity while providing many of the cross-curricular aspects -
L.A./Science/Math.

I wonder how many teachers, because of time restrictions, end up doing the
TIMS experiments as teacher-led demonstrations and thereby thwart a major
element of their potential efficacy?

Richard

====================================

From: ToniU@aol.com
Date: Wed, 7 Jun 1995 20:06:27 -0400
To: nctm-l@forum.swarthmore.edu
Subject: Re: Early Elementary programs

Another good elementary program is the Mimosa program. It is language-based
as opposed to being literature based. It includes literature, but is
provides a rich language experience based on mathematical content.

====================================

Date: Fri, 9 Jun 1995 16:16:23 -0400
To: 23156wr@ibm.cl.msu.edu
From: dball@pilotb.msu.edu (Deborah Ball)
Subject: Re: Early Elem Programs

Bill-- see comments below, marked with ***s.

>
>Deborah -- Do you have any comments on these? CSMP seems
>highly recommeded. Deservedly so?


*****I really, really like it, and it was very important in my own
professional development. I also had experience trying to "implement" it
in a school district and it met with uneven success. It is a program that
inspires real enthusiasm and also throrough rejection. I think that is a
sign that it is good -- it really has substance,and so people react
positively or negatively to it. it is not mush.

*****I especially agree with this response:

>>1) it is easily the most "mathematical" of all programs available for the
>>primary grades; 2) it is a nationally validated program which means there
>>is adoption support available thru the National Diffusion Network; and 3)
>>many of the ideas appearing in the NCTM Standards were presaged by earlier
>>versions of the CSMP curriculum.
>>
>>The only caution I have is that teachers must go thru a special teacher
>>education program before a school can adopt the program--you can't just
>>send in a book order and get the materials. But I personally view this as a
>>good feature. If the teacher who called you is also from Michigan, I feel
>>certain that there are "lighthouse sites" in your state where the new
>>CSMP/21 materials are being used.
>>Ron Ward/Western Washington U/Bellingham, WA 98225 ronaward@henson.cc.wwu.edu


Deborah

====================================

Date: Wed, 14 Jun 1995 11:54:17 -0500
To: 23156wr@ibm.cl.msu.edu (Bill Richards - Michigan Gateways)
From: 0191enel@informns.k12.mn.us (Eileen Abrahamson)
Subject: Re: Early Elementary programs

>Fellow Subscribers --
>
>A teacher called me this morning at Michigan Gateways (the Television
>Program for Teachers of Math and Science), looking for leads on "a new,
>strong math program to adopt" for K-2.


Our district curriculum is based on the math standards, and has a
constructivist focus to learning. Based on that, after two hears of
extensive research, we found only two publishers that recognized the
constructivist focus and "truly" implemented the philosophy of the
standards. Addison Wesley's Quest 2000 and Creative Publications Math
Land.

We chose Addison Wesley's Quest 2000 because of the company support
available (a big corporation, that would provide lots of staff development)
There are however, glaring weaknesses with the Addison Wesley materials.
The weakness is the assessment materials. They are poorly constructed,
inadequate, do not maintain the philosophy of the instructional materails,
and are mis-representational. (They claim to have portfolio assessment
materials, but in fact only have a few portfolio collection ideas.)

Creative Publications program was equally strong in math and assessment,
but the company is small and support from them was non-existant or weak.
Our district was uncomfortable getting involved with a small company that
could not guarntee delivery dates etc.

In the two years of study, I have found that "no" resource materials are
strong in every aspect of instruction, philosophy, and assessment. We had
to find the one with the weaknesses that would be easiest to repair, and
the company that was most willing and able to work with us.

Eileen

Eileen Abrahamson
0191enel@informns.k12.mn.us
Edw. Neill Elemetary
13409 Upton Ave. So.
Burnsville, MN 55337
====================================
End of compiled messages
====================================








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