Drexel dragonThe Math ForumDonate to the Math Forum



Search All of the Math Forum:

Views expressed in these public forums are not endorsed by Drexel University or The Math Forum.


Math Forum » Discussions » Education » math-teach

Topic: Re: Are humans...(a better way to teach stats?) (fd) (fwd)
Replies: 0  

Advanced Search

Back to Topic List Back to Topic List  
Michael Paul Goldenberg

Posts: 7,041
From: Ann Arbor, MI
Registered: 12/3/04
Re: Are humans...(a better way to teach stats?) (fd) (fwd)
Posted: Nov 20, 1995 9:00 PM
  Click to see the message monospaced in plain text Plain Text   Click to reply to this topic Reply

At 6:15 PM 11/20/95, Lutemann@aol.com wrote:
>In a message dated 95-11-20 14:03:29 EST, toom@the-college.iwctx.edu (Andrei
>TOOM) writes:
>

>>The trouble with this is frankly that lots of these real-world
>>(or "real-world" - I don't think it makes much difference!) problems,
>>are, frankly, BORING. As Pat Ballew says, no student is actually
>>interested in problems about defective light-bulbs, even though one or two

>of
>>the people who make light-bulbs might be very interested in the answers.
>>
>>

>
>This is true. Students can be turned on by interesting problems, but
>virtually none care if the problem has real world applications. To a 16 year
>old, the real world is getting a date, not defective light bulbs.
>
>Kent


So what would you conclude from this observation, Kent? Ignore student
interests, or take advantage of it to construct problems that take their
interests into account without sacrificing mathematical depth and meaning?

|---------------------------------------------------------------------------
|Michael Paul Goldenberg
|University of Michigan 310 E. Cross St.
|School of Education 4002 Ypsilanti, MI 48198
|Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1259 (313) 482-9585
|(313) 747-2244
|
|"Truth is a mobile army of metaphors."
|Friedrich Nietzsche
|---------------------------------------------------------------------------







Point your RSS reader here for a feed of the latest messages in this topic.

[Privacy Policy] [Terms of Use]

© Drexel University 1994-2014. All Rights Reserved.
The Math Forum is a research and educational enterprise of the Drexel University School of Education.