Learning from Teaching Cases Summary

Monday - Friday, July 16 - 20, 2007

Monday July 16, 2007

SSTP Participants: Nicole, Connie, Kelley, Bree, Mitch, Amy, Angie, Rey, Sarah, Joe, Sandy

Visitors: Joyce Evans (NSF)

Daily Summary: Today we reviewed our observations about and questions we had from visiting Aki's class last Friday. Everyone shared what "lens" he/she was focusing on and some things that he/she noticed.

Then, we worked on hashing out what we will create as our working group product. We narrowed down our options and then voted on the top three ideas. The final decision was that we will make a video about how teachers can use video as a productive tool to learn more about teaching and student learning. We talked about our intended audience and our purpose for the video, i.e. what we wanted people to get out of it. Then we created an outline for the main points we wanted to hit:

  1. Introduction: why is using video a good idea? (Rey & Amy)
  2. What watching video is/is not (Joe & Mitch)
  3. Using a "lens" to watch video (Bree & Angie)
  4. Showcasing examples of productive and non-productive video conversations (Sarah & Sandy)

Before we left we went around the room and took "quick polls" about the various topics for each pair to work on fleshing out further before we meet tomorrow.Our homework assignment for tonight is to come up with a ~10 second "sound byte" of our biggest AHA! moment.

Summary written by: Bree

Tuesday July 17, 2007

SSTP Participants: Nicole, Connie, Kelley, Bree, Mitch, Amy, Angie, Rey, Sarah, Joe, Sandy

Visitors: n/a

Daily Summary: We discussed each individual portion of our group's final presentation to the rest of the SSTP staff and participants. We each worked in smaller groups to come up with responses to the following prompts:

1) An introduction to watching video of teachers teaching. 2) What "video club" is and what it is not. 3) What does "watching the video through a different lens" mean? 4) Examples of productive and non-productive conversation about the video.

We worked as a whole group to solidify exactly what we wanted to get across to everyone on Friday of this week. I believe that once everyone got on the same page, me especially, we are on the road to a fun and informative presentation. Our group works very well together and like any other "family" we care about each other and what each of us brings to the table. A great team!

Summary written by: Mitch Jensen

Thursday July 19, 2007

SSTP Participants: Nicole, Connie, Kelley, Bree, Mitch, Amy, Angie, Rey, Sarah, Joe, Sandy

Visitors: Debbie Bannister (Nicole's mom)

Daily Summary: Today was our last day together and we spent the time summarizing all that we have covered so far. We watched our video (final project) and some group members shared stories of personal success. We also took time to watch several videos that we did not get a chance to see earlier on. One that was extremely fascinating was of a group of seniors working together, successfully, on a group test. It was a nice day of closure and we were given some extra reading materials to take home so we can continue our studies of topics like grouping, status, and teacher choices.

Summary written by: Sarah Farley

Friday July 20, 2007

SSTP Participants: Nicole, Connie, Kelley, Bree, Mitch, Amy, Angie, Rey, Sarah, Joe, Sandy

Visitors: n/a

Daily Summary: Today we presented our video to the SSTP participants. We were excited to share what we learned with everyone!

Summary written by: Rey Jope

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This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0314808.
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