Chapter-by-Chapter Resources

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You'll notice the image next to some of the resources. This indicates a resource that's especially for people who have a copy of Powerful Problem Solving. The first time you access one of these resources, we'll ask you a special question about the book that you'll use to make a free Math Forum account.

Chapter 1: Introduction

Chapter 2: Communication and Community

  • On page 17 we mention more mathematical puzzles and challenges for students to work on in groups. Here are some:
  • Suzanne's Quiet Game activities and downloadable Puzzle Templates.
  • If you'd like to use tablets or computers to play the Mission Control activity mentioned on page 18, here are some resources:
    • Pattern blocks applet from the National Library of Virtual Manipulatives.
    • Jing allows students to capture 5 minute videos of their computer screens, with audio. The "astronauts" can record their screens with audio of "mission control"'s instructions, and then play it back for mission control!
    • Apps like EduCreations and ScreenChomp allow student to record their iPad screens along with audio. While they can't "screen capture" from other apps, "mission control" can make drawings that they then describe for the "astronauts".
  • Max wrote a blog post reflecting further on the Making a Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich activity on page 19.
  • And here are some videos of teachers and students carrying out students' instructions for making a PB&J.
  • On page 21 we refer to Suzanne's Ignite talk, Unsilence Students' Voices.

Chapter 3: Learning Through Listening

  • On page 25 we refer to Model-Based Physics. You can learn more about model-based science education at their website. You might also enjoy Frank Noschese's blog describing his model-based physics class.
  • On page 27 we refer to Max's Ignite talk about Why 2 > 4. Watch it here.
  • On page 29 we shared the candidate for the 6th grade $1,000,000 unsolved problem from MathPickle.com.
  • On page 30 we shared a blog post from Bob Lochel about The Take-Away Game.
  • On page 33 the "Clarifying Questions Mingle" is based on this activity from Training for Change.
  • On page 34 we described students working on the Pizza Night PoW. Owners of Powerful Problem Solving can access the PoW as well as see possible solutions and student work in the Teacher Packet, and explore the other resources linked in the light blue box.
  • Here is the Student Handout for the What's the Same? What's Different? activity on page 33.
  • Here is a link to the When Smart Groups Fail article mentioned on page 40.

Chapter 4: Noticing and Wondering

  • On page 43 we described students working on the Teresa's Tiles PoW. Owners of Powerful Problem Solving can access the PoW as well as see possible solutions and student work in the Teacher Packet, and explore the other resources linked in the light blue box.
  • Here is the Student Handout for the I Notice, I Wonder Brainstorm activity on page 46.
  • Here are some of the additional resources for finding prompts to Notice and Wonder about that we mention on page 47:
  • On page 49 we describe how Suzanne would unfold a Problem of the Week in just five to ten minutes a day. Here's her article called "Think You Don't Have Time to Use the PoWs?"
  • On page 50 we described students working on the Sports Weigh-In PoW. Owners of Powerful Problem Solving can access the PoW as well as see possible solutions and student work in the Teacher Packet, and explore the other resources linked in the light blue box.

Chapter 5: Change the Representation: Seeing the Big Picture

Chapter 6: Engaging Students' Number Sense Through Guessing

Chapter 7: Getting Organized

  • On page 92 we described students working on the Integer Images PoW. Owners of Powerful Problem Solving can access the PoW as well as see possible solutions and student work in the Teacher Packet, and explore the other resources linked in the light blue box.
  • On page 94 we described students working on the Cupcakes, Cupcakes! PoW. Owners of Powerful Problem Solving can access the PoW as well as see possible solutions and student work in the Teacher Packet, and explore the other resources linked in the light blue box.
  • On page 97 we described students and their families working on the Cat Walk PoW. Owners of Powerful Problem Solving can access the PoW as well as see possible solutions and student work in the Teacher Packet, and explore the other resources linked in the light blue box.
  • On page 99, we mentioned a student-friendly handout for Setting Up and Sharing Tables.
  • On page 101 we described students working on the Marble Mayhem PoW. Owners of Powerful Problem Solving can access the PoW as well as see possible solutions and student work in the Teacher Packet, and explore the other resources linked in the light blue box.
  • On page 104, we mentioned an activity and student-friendly handout for Extreme Write It Out.
  • Since publishing the book, we came across a neat activity that helps students make sense of substitution, a key part of the Write It Out and Extreme Write It Out activities. Check out Elizabeth's blog post about Substitution Stars.

Chapter 8: Generalizing, Abstracting, and Modeling

  • On page 110 we described students working on the Frog Farming PoW. Owners of Powerful Problem Solving can access the PoW as well as see possible solutions and student work in the Teacher Packet, and explore the other resources linked in the light blue box.
  • On page 116, we mentioned a student-friendly handout for comparing and reflecting on representations.
  • On page 117 we described students working on the Ostrich Llama Count PoW. Owners of Powerful Problem Solving can access the PoW as well as see possible solutions and student work in the Teacher Packet, and explore the other resources linked in the light blue box.
  • On page 118 we described students working on the Trick or Treat Routes PoW. Owners of Powerful Problem Solving can access the PoW as well as see possible solutions and student work in the Teacher Packet, and explore the other resources linked in the light blue box.
  • On page 125 we mentioned that Visual Patterns was a great reference for problems to use with the Problem-Solving Bids activity.
  • This blog post by Fawn Nguyen reminded us a lot of the ideas behind the Problem-Solving Bids and What Would Happen If? activities on pages 125 and 127
  • On page 130 we mention using Twitter to solicit multiple representations for math problems. If you're new to Twitter, Max explains it in 5 minutes in his Ignite video, "Tweet Me, Maybe?"
  • Here is the Student Handout for helping students compare similarities and differences in their classmates' models and representations, which we mention on page 130.
  • On page 134 we mention Dan Meyer's work on the "Ladder of Abstraction". You can read more on his blog.

Chapter 9: Looking for Structure

Chapter 10: The Problem-Solving Process and Metacognition

  • On page 153 we described students working on the Wooden Legs PoW. Owners of Powerful Problem Solving can access the PoW as well as see possible solutions and student work in the Teacher Packet, and explore the other resources linked in the light blue box.
  • On page 158 we described students working on the Charlie's Gumballs PoW. Owners of Powerful Problem Solving can access the PoW as well as see possible solutions and student work in the Teacher Packet, and explore the other resources linked in the light blue box.
  • Jing allows students to capture 5 minute videos of their computer screens, with audio. Students can use this to capture (and review) their best problem solving!
  • Here is the Wonderama Reproducible for the Wonderama activity on page 165.
  • Here are the Getting Unstuck and I Don't Know What to Do Reproducibles mentioned on page 167.

Chapter 11: Reflecting, Revising, Justifying, and Extending

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