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Q&A #176

Teachers' Lounge Discussion: Place value

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From: Cheryl <fortnerc@hotmail.com>
To: Teacher2Teacher Public Discussion
Date: 1998071011:50:55
Subject: Usning calculators in the classromm

I am a fourth grade teacher and do an activity similar to one posted.

Put students in twos or threes and have each student take a turn with
the following; student 1 holds calculator, student 2 gives a three-
digit number to student 1 to punch in, after punching in the number
student 1 should hit the + key.  The calculator is passed to student
3, who is told by student 1 to add a specific number of ones, tens or
hundreds to the number, after student 3 does this he/she should hit
the + key and pass the calculator to student 2, student 3 tells
student 2 to enter a specifice number of ones, tens, or hundreds, to
this number, student 2 should push the = key to show the final number.
Each student should take turns sayin the new number.

There are several variations to this actvity.  I have my files at
school so I can't think of the others off the top of my head. Check
back at my email in a week or so for others. To the K-2 teacher, try
using an overhead calculator to ease the students into the how-to
process.  

If anyone has some higher-level activities for students I am 
desperately seeking them. Have a great summer, fellow professionals!

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