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Q&A #4508

Teachers' Lounge Discussion: Decorating my classroom

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From: Robin <FL_rstutes@omalp1.omeresa.net>
To: Teacher2Teacher Public Discussion
Date: 2001110815:35:40
Subject: RE: Decorating my classroom

Here's a couple of ideas I use:
1.  Cut a tree trunk from brown construction paper. 
    Cover board with blue paper at the top, and some green paper at
    the bottom.  Staple tree trunk in middle of board. Next, I write
    the rules for divisibility out on individual apples.  On another
    apple, I write the number for the rule.  Staple the apples with
    the rules onto the tree, and then staple the number ontop of this.
    This creates a flip chart for the rules.
2.  For Halloween, I put black paper on the board.  Staple a skeleton
    on one side.  Microsoft Word has a graphic of cross bones.  I 
    printed this, enlarged, and made several copies.  Cut these out,
    lamenate, and use as the boarder for the display.  Using white
    letters, I place the words "No Bones About It...Math Is Spook-
    tacular!"  The students love this one!

I have a few others, if you would like pictures, or written
instructions, please feel free to email me at
FL_rstutes@omalp1.omeresa.net with mailing instructions, and I would
gladly send some ideas.  And...maybe you could share some you have
discovered as well.  Thanks!  Robin


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