Suggestions for
Finding Maps


by Suzanne Alejandre


Here are some suggestions for finding a map:

Do you want a small map of a country in the world? Use these directions for the CIA World Factbook 2001 or the EIA site to find it.

Do you want a small map of a specific city or area in the United States? Use these directions for the TIGER service from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Do you want to browse some of the map images that are on the Web? Use these directions to search Google.com for non-copyrighted images. Use the site www.topozone.com suggested by Craig Russell.

CIA World Factbook 2001:
http://www.cia.gov/cia/publications/factbook/
If you start here you will see an alphabetical listing of countries on the left side of the page. Select the country that you are interested in and you will see a map of that country at the top of the page.

After you have located the map you can save the gif or jpeg by clicking on it and selecting "save this image as" or "download image to disk" or whatever prompt your browser provides.

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Energy Information Administration Home Page (EIA):
http://www.eia.doe.gov/emeu/cabs/contents.html
If you start here you will see a map of the world. Select the area that you are interested in, for example, South America. Now select a specific country from that continent, for example, Venezuela.

After you have located the map you can save the gif or jpeg by clicking on it and holding until you are prompted to "save this image as" or "download image to disk" or something else similar.

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Google.com: Advanced Image Search:
http://google.com/advanced_image_search?hl=en

If you start here I would suggest putting in the following parameters:

I found that by marking "large" that actually gave what I considered to be the appropriate sized gif to use. You will be given page(s) of small gifs or jpegs to view. At the bottom of the page you can navigate between pages as you would in a "regular" return from a Google search.

As you select one you will see the map at the top of the page. Click on it and the actual size of the gif will be displayed. Click on it and hold until you are prompted to "save this image as" or "download image to disk" or something else similar.

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U.S. Census Bureau's TIGER (Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing) Mapping Service:
http://tiger.census.gov/cgi-bin/mapbrowse-tbl/
There are many choices on this site and after experimenting I found that these procedures produced a pretty good map.
  1. Check these selections and redraw:


  2. After you have zoomed in or out and have the image as you want it, select to download it:

    and then click the image. The gif will be displayed in the window. Click on it and hold until you are prompted to "save this image as" or "download image to disk" or something else similar.
  3. Near the bottom of the page you can "search for a U.S. city or town" by typing the name of the city or the zip code. You can make adjustments to those maps using the selections described above. For some reason a "red stick pin" appears on those maps. If you delete the longitude and latitude numbers and redraw, that stickpin will disappear.
  4. NOTE: The scale is a separate gif and you can also download it.

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