Email about the Eclipse Project

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From: slevy@geom.umn.edu
Date: Tue, 28 Jun 94 18:00:58 -0500
To: forum14@netcom.com
Subject: Re: Path of totality next year? Solar eclipse Cc: fjw@geom.umn.edu

Hi. Here are some information sources:

``Fifty Year Canon of Solar Eclipses: 1986 - 2035'', by Fred Espenak,
published by NASA in 1987. Your library might have it (ours does), or it's
available from Sky Publishing Corp. (the people who publish Sky & Telescope
magazine):
Sky Publishing Corp
Box 9111
Belmont, MA 02178
According to their catalog, it's order number 4645X and costs $24.95, plus
$2.00 postage. Includes detailed world maps showing tracks of eclipses from
1901-2099; also detailed predictions with lat/lon coordinates for eclipse
tracks for eclipses 1986 through 2035. 


Another option:

NASA now produces a series on solar eclipses, published 18-24 months before
the event, giving detailed eclipse predictions, commentary on weather
expected along the eclipse track, and so on. Single copies are available
free. Here's a clone of their order form:

Name of Organization _______________________________ 

Name of Contact Person ______________________________ 

Address ____________________________________________ 

City, State, Zip ___________________________________ 


Type of organization [ ] Professional [ ] Publication [ ] Amateur 
[ ] University/College [ ] Individual
[ ] Observatory [ ] Commercial

Number of members in organization _______ 

Activities _______________________________ 

Request Publications (check one)
a) [ ] for specific eclipse (give date)
b) [ ] for eclipses with local interest only c) [ ] for all eclipses


-- Send requests by surface mail to:
Jay Anderson
Prairie Weather Centre
900-266 Graham Avenue
Winnipeg, Manitoba
Canada R3C 3V4

or by e-mail to:
janders@ccm.umanitoba.ca

and send comments to:

Fred Espenak
NASA/GSFC
Code 693
Greenbelt, MD 20771
USA

Xref: netcom.com sci.astro.planetarium:1013
Newsgroups: sci.astro.planetarium
Path: netcom.com!slwork
From: slwork@netcom.com (Steven L. Work)
Subject: Re: path of totality next year?solar eclipse
Message-ID: 
Organization: NETCOM On-line Communication Services (408 261-4700 guest)
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Date: Tue, 28 Jun 1994 13:33:29 GMT
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Trish Herndon (forum14@netcom.com) wrote:
: We are four teachers from across the state of Georgia who are developing
a
: project for high school geometry students as part of our Geometry Forum
: Workshop this week (June 27-July1).  We would like information concerning
: paths of totality for solar eclipses for the next five years.  This
: information should concern times, distances, areas, or ways to calculate
: these topics.  We plan to have our students map the path as the eclipse
: moves over land mass, and communicate over Internet. Please reply via
: e-mail. Trish

Could the results please be posted here, (sci.astro).  Others (like me) 
just might be interested, too.

From: HenriP@aol.com
X-Mailer: America Online Mailer
Sender: "HenriP" 
To: forum14@netcom.com
Date: Thu, 30 Jun 94 12:38:03 EDT
Subject: eclipse project

Trish--

You will want to complement whatever you're doing with other astronomy
info. Get Astronomy magazine. It has lots of beautiful photos, and the
articles are 
quite accessible. If you use Macs, get the Voyager software. It allows you
to choose where on Earth you are, and what date and time, and it shows what
the sky looks like, animated if you wish. So you can "play" any eclipse (as
seen from Earth). Planetariums and the people who work there are also great
resources. A visit to your class from someone who works at a planetarium
could be as valuable as a visit to the planetarium. 

Also you may want to get the kids to record moon sightings daily. Where in
the sky? what time? what shape? what position with respect to the sun? to
the planets? Doing this for 6 weeks or so gives kids (and adults!) major
insights about the actual moon in their sky that cannot easily be obtained
by reading or using computers.

The best resource for naked-eye sky-watching is the Sky Calendar, published
monthly in Science and Children, I believe, and available by mail from the
Michigan State University planetarium.

--Henri


Date: Fri, 1 Jul 1994 07:46:16 +0800 (GMT+0800) From: Tan Yap Kwang

Subject: Re: Thanks for help-Solar Eclipse Project To: Trish Herndon

Mime-Version: 1.0


On Thu, 30 Jun 1994, Trish Herndon wrote: 

>At the beginning of this week (June 27-July1), 3 other Geometry teachers
and I sent out a message for help with information on the path of totality
of the Solar Eclipse within the next 5-10 years so we might start a project
with our students around Georgia and the USA. The response has been super
with ideas on resources, e-mail addresses, newsgroups, etc. that we could
get in touch with for help. Thanks to all of you who helped us pool
together our materials to build a basis for our project. Even though this
started out as a workshop project for teachers learning to use Internet, we
can forsee a project taking place linking those students who may actually
be in the path of the eclipse in the next year or so. We do know there is
one predicted for Nov. 3, 1994, and are pulling up resources for it and
others at the present time. Math related activities are being planned,
also.

>Again, thanks for your help and response! It was great to get "mail" even
though we were away from home.

Would be grateful if you could share the info. with Singapore teachers, who
are just beginning to be linked to the Internet. 

Regards

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-- TAN YAP KWANG	Internet: tyk@moe.ac.sg
Monitoring & Evaluation Branch	Tel: (65) 4709431
Ministry of Education	Fax: (65) 4709256
Singapore 1024
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
-- 

Date: Thu, 30 Jun 1994 10:36:34 -0400
Reply-To: ednet@nic.umass.edu
Originator: ednet@nic.umass.edu
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From: forum14@netcom.com (Trish Herndon) To: forum6@netcom.com
Subject: Thanks for help-Solar Eclipse Project X-Listprocessor-Version:
6.0c -- ListProcessor by Anastasios Kotsikonas X-Comment: Local forum on
educational possibilities of the Net 

At the beginning of this week (June 27-July1), 3 other Geometry teachers
and I sent out a message for help with information on the path of totality
of the Solar Eclipse within the next 5-10 years so we might start a project
with our students around Georgia and the USA. The response has been super
with ideas on resources, e-mail addresses, newsgroups, etc. that we could
get in touch with for help. Thanks to all of you who helped us pool
together our materials to build a basis for our project. Even though this
started out as a workshop project for teachers learning to use Internet, we
can forsee a project taking place linking those students who may actually
be in the path of the eclipse in the next year or so. We do know there is
one predicted for Nov. 3, 1994, and are pulling up resources for it and
others at the present time. Math related activities are being planned,
also.

Again, thanks for your help and response! It was great to get "mail" even
though we were away from home.

-Kris Fitzgerald, Shiloh High School, Lithonia, GA -Trish Herndon,
LaFayette High School, LaFayette, GA -Walter Brooks, Fitzgerald High
School, Fitzgerald, GA -Martha Carter, Turner County High School, Ashville,
GA 

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